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Cher takes to London catwalk to raise awareness of ovarian cancer

14 March 2016

Cher

Photograph by Vicki Ellis

A housing professional from Faversham in Kent is set to strut down the catwalk later this month to help improve early diagnosis and save lives through raising awareness and funds for ovarian cancer.

After being diagnosed with ovarian cancer in August 2011 Cher Oddy, a floating support officer for national housing provider Hanover Housing Association, spent five months undergoing chemotherapy treatment before finding her cancer was in remission.

In May 2013 Cher took part in a Cancer Research UK’s Race for Life event, only to discover two days later that the cancer had returned. After undergoing further treatment, her doctors informed that her cancer was incurable.

But it’s hard to keep a fighter down and since her diagnoses Cher has embarked on a personal campaign to raise awareness of ovarian cancer. Among the many activities she has taken part in are several Macmillan Cancer Support photo shoots, numerous coffee mornings, and helping to motivate the audiences of both Good Morning Britain and BBC Radio 5 live. She has also met with members of the All Party Parliamentary Group on Ovarian Cancer.

Cher said: 'Whilst the last few years have been among the most challenging in my life,I have managed to open up a few doors I never realised existed.

'Although it is out of my comfort zone I am looking forward to taking part in the fashion show and raising awareness for cancer sufferers amongst a sell-out crowd.'

March is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month and as part of this year’s activities a fashion show has been organised by Ovacome at the luxurious May Fair Hotel in London. All models taking part in the Saturday 19 March event have either been diagnosed with or have combatted ovarian cancer.

Adele Sewell from Ovacome said: 'While it takes real self-belief to be able to waltz down a catwalk in front of hundreds of people, that’s nothing compared to the strength and tenacity these fabulous models have shown in tackling ovarian cancer.

'Cher has been particularly instrumental in raising awareness of the issue and it’s thanks to people like her that we can continue to make a difference. It’s essential that there is a greater understanding of the terrible impact ovarian cancer can have, and it’s also important that sufferers know that there is a great support network available after diagnosis.'

Ovarian cancer is the sixth most common cancer among British women, with around 20 cases diagnosed every day. More than half of ovarian cancer cases in the UK each year are diagnosed in females aged 65 and over, most of which are diagnosed at a late stage.

If you would like to help Cher raise money for cancer research, visit her Just Giving page.

More information on Ovarian Cancer Awareness month can be found on the Ovacome website.

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